Can We Play You Every Week?

by Max Velody

Can We Play You Every Week? gets right under the skin of every football league club and captures the great moments all fans cherish. Packed with anecdotes, quotes, tall tales, small players, crooks, corruption and crackpots, worst signings and bizarre injuries, this book is essential reading for anyone with the love of our national sport running through their veins.
Get the low-down on the chasm between rich teams and poor, find out which club was elected to the league without kicking a ball and which goalie took a bung because he couldn’t sell his bungalow. Be amazed at the club owner who believed in aliens and the player whose career was ended by an ironing board. But, most of all, read about the heroism, love and loyalty of ordinary fans, the thousands who have kept their clubs going when the chips were really down…

“Can We Play You Every Week has something to please every fan… there is often a whiff of Wikipedia about books like these, but Velody really knows his stuff, and every pen-portrait is lavish with anecdote, trivia and opinion.” — Daily Telegraph

“Witty, well put together and appealing… With each team listed in alphabetical order and having its own section, Max Velody’s work is easy to dip in and out of, although you may find yourself wanting to read it all in one go. Getting the factual and anecdotal lowdown on any side in the top four tiers of the country’s football pyramid couldn’t be simpler… However, the truly endearing quality about this book is that despite being jam packed with obscure snippets, the text doesn’t read like Velody has spent endless hours cutting and pasting results from Google and Wikipedia, which it easily could do had it been produced by someone with less charisma and nous.” — Matthew Hayley, Supporters Direct

“…By far the best of these is Max Velody’s Can We Play You Every Week? (Short Books £12.99), an entertaining survey of all 92 clubs in the football league. Velody writes authoratively and wittily about every club in the country’s four divisions, from Accrington Stanley to Yeovil Town. He provides a history, a checklist of their most remarkable moments and a selection of bizarre incidents that have befallen each club over the years. His prose is infectiously warm and brims with the sort of humour that keeps the reader turning the page to mine more gems from the rich seam of fact, trivia and anecdote he’s skilfully assembled. This is the sort of writing that underpinned the rise of the fanzine movement in the Nineties, but which is now as in short supply as home-born players in the premiership. Which leaves me with only one thing to say about the man behind the book: Velody for England!” — John Tague, The New Review

“A wonderfully irreverent study of all 92 league football clubs, this gem of a book contains a host of facts that will not be found in more solemn works of reference. So, in the chapter on Rochdale, we learn that the club’s striker of the early Sixties, ‘Little Joe’ Richardson, also earned a nocturnal living as an ‘Alsatian kidnapper’, selling the bewildered hounds from the back of his van to Liverpool security firms. Similarly, the chapter on Sheffield United contains the startling image of the club’s 24-stone goalkeeper, William ‘Fatty’ Foulke, striding down the corridor stark naked after the 1902 Cup Final as he sought to confront the referee over a controversial decision. For Velody, the real heroes of lower league football are the fans, whose dedication has kept so many clubs alive.” — The Sunday Telegraph

“Every chapter starts with an appropriate quote, of which a fine example is Dennis Wise describing life at Chelsea: “Obviously there’s a language barrier. The majority of the lads speak Italian but there are a few who don’t.” Velody also provides contact details for every club and nominates local heroes. A practical and entertaining work.” — The Telegraph

“Velody’s prose brims with the sort of humour that keeps the reader turning the page to mine more gems from the rich seam of fact, trivia and anecdote he’s skilfully assembled. This is the sort of writing that underpinned the rise of the fanzine movement in the Nineties, but which is now in as short supply as home-born players in the premiership.” — The Sunday Times

“A guide with attitude. It’s funny, irreverent and bound to cause controversy.” — Manchester Evening News

About Max Velody

Max Velody is not that old but his match-day ticket costs precisely 432 times more than it did when he saw his first game. Bovril is Max's half-time drink of choice and he worries it is going out of fashion. His team has won just one trophy in the last 70 years. Max is very confident this will be their year.